top of page

Fitness Group

Public·34 members
Woldemar Zykov
Woldemar Zykov

Where Can I Buy A Sprint Phone [PORTABLE]


Limited-time offer; subject to change. Register code within 30 days of activating qualifying new unlimited Home Internet or Small Business Internet line. If you have cancelled Home Internet lines in past 90 days, you may need to reactivate them first. $50 via virtual prepaid Mastercard, which you can use online or in-store via accepted mobile payment apps; no cash access & expires in 6 months. The Virtual Prepaid Mastercard is issued by Sunrise Banks N.A., Member FDIC, pursuant to a license from Mastercard International Incorporated. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated. This card may be used everywhere Debit Mastercard is accepted. Registration, activation, acceptance, or use of this card constitutes acceptance of the terms and conditions stated in the Prepaid Card Agreement. This promotion is not associated, sponsored, or endorsed by Mastercard or Sunrise Banks N.A. Allow 12 weeks from fulfilment of offer requirements. Lines must be active and in good standing when card is issued. Max 1/account. May not be combined with some offers or discounts.




where can i buy a sprint phone



4 Lines: Limited time offer; subject to change. Qualifying credit & minimum 4 lines required. Canceling any lines requires you to move to the regular rate Essentials plan; contact us. $5 more per line without AutoPay. Limit 1 offer per account. May not be combined with some offers or discounts; existing customers who switch may lose certain benefits and monthly device credits. General Terms: $35 device connection charge due at sale. Credit approval & deposit may be required.] Monthly Regulatory Programs (RPF) & Telco Recovery Fee (TRF) totaling $3.49 per voice line ($0.50 for RPF & $2.99 for TRF) and $1.40 per data only line ($0.12 for RPF & $1.28 for TRF) applies; taxes/fees approx. 4-38% of bill. Capable device required for some features. Not combinable with certain offers. Switching plans may cause you to lose current plan/feature benefits; ask a rep for details. Max 6 lines. Plan not available for hotspots and some other data-first devices. Unlimited talk & text features for direct communications between 2 people; others (e.g., conference & chat lines, etc.) may cost extra. Some messages, including those over 1MB, use data and may be unavailable internationally. Roaming: U.S. roaming and on-network data allotments differ: includes 200MB roaming. High-speed data is US only; in Canada/Mexico, unlimited at up to 128kbps; additional purchase required for data elsewhere. Calls from Simple Global countries, including over Wi-Fi, are $.25/min. (no charge for Wi-Fi calls to US, Mexico and Canada). Service may be terminated or restricted for excessive roaming. Not for extended international use; you must reside in the U.S. and primary usage must occur on our U.S. network. Device must register on our U.S. network before international use. Video streams at up to 2.5Mbps (SD). Optimization may affect speed of video downloads; does not apply to video uploads. For best performance, leave any video streaming applications at their default automatic resolution setting. Tethering at max 3G speeds. For customers using >50GB/mo., primary data usage must be on smartphone or tablet. Smartphone/tablet usage is prioritized over Mobile Hotspot (tethering) usage, which may result in higher speeds for data used on smartphones and tablets. AutoPay Pricing for lines 1-6. Without AutoPay, $5 more/line/mo. May not be reflected on 1st bill.


Sprint traced its origins to the Brown Telephone Company, which was founded in 1899 to bring telephone service to the rural area around Abilene, Kansas. In 2006, Sprint left the local landline telephone business and spun those assets off into a new company named Embarq, which later became a part of Lumen Tech (formerly CenturyLink), which remains one of the largest long-distance providers in the United States.


Brown Telephone Company was founded in 1899 by Cleyson Brown, to deploy the first telephone service to the rural area around Abilene, Kansas.[15] The Browns installed their first long-distance circuit in 1900 and became an alternative to the Bell Telephone Company, the most popular telephone service at the time.[citation needed] In 1911, C. L. Brown consolidated the Brown Telephone Company with three other independents to form the United Telephone Company.[16] C. L. Brown formed United Telephone and Electric (UT&E) in 1925. In 1939, at the end of the Great Depression, UT&E reorganized to form United Utilities.[16]


In 1964, Paul H. Henson became president of United Utilities; two years later, he was named chairman.[17] When Henson began working at the company in 1959, it had 575,000 telephones in 15 states and revenues of $65 million.[18][19][17] Henson is credited with creating the first major fiber optic network, having recognized it as a way to handle more calls and provide better quality sound.[17]


Sprint Corporation entered the Canadian market in the early 1990s as a reseller of bulk long-distance telephone lines that it bought from domestic companies. Under Canadian foreign ownership regulations, Sprint could not open its own network. In 1993, Sprint entered into a strategic alliance with Call-Net Enterprises, a Canadian long-distance service, and bought 25 percent of the company.[30] Call-Net's long-distance service was renamed "Sprint Canada", and expanded to include landline and internet services. In 2005, Call-Net and Sprint Canada's 600,000 customers were acquired by Rogers Communications.[31]


In 1994, Sprint announces plans for a powerful new venture with three of the nation's major cable television companies, Tele-Communications Inc. (TCI), Comcast Corp. and Cox Cable. The four companies outline plans to build a nationwide network to provide wireless personal communications service (PCS), and also affirm their support for a single integrated offering of wireless, local telephone and long distance services in a package with cable television service[36]


In 1999, Sprint began recombining its local telecom, long-distance, wireline, and wireless business units into a new company, in an initiative known internally as "One Sprint". In April 2004, the separately traded wireless tracking stock PCS was absorbed into the New York Stock Exchange FON ticker symbol, Sprint's former ticker symbol (FON stood for "Fiber Optic Network", but was also a homophone of the word "phone").[42] This was challenged in many lawsuits by Sprint PCS shareholders who felt their stock was devalued because it was trading at the ratio of 1 share of PCS stock for 1/2 share of FON stock. The PCS shareholders claimed a loss of 1.3 billion to 3.4 billion dollars.[43]


On December 15, 2004, Sprint Corporation and Nextel Communications announced they would merge to form Sprint Nextel Corporation.[44] The merger was transacted as a purchase of Nextel Communications by Sprint Corporation for tax reasons; Sprint purchased 50.1 percent of Nextel. At the time of the merger announcement, Sprint and Nextel were the third and fifth leading providers in the U.S. mobile phone industry, respectively.[45]


The integration process was difficult due to disparate network technologies. Sprint tried to address this with the advent of PowerSource phones. These phones routed voice call and data services over Sprint's PCS spectrum while maintaining DirectConnect services over 800 MHz spectrum. However, this was not sufficient in coverage, due to the inability to roam on a non-PCS spectrum.[citation needed] Top Nextel Executives began leaving the company immediately after the merger closed. Tim Donahue, the Nextel CEO, stayed on as executive chairman, but ceded decision-making authority to Gary D. Forsee. Tom Kelly, COO of Nextel, took an interim staff position as Chief Strategy Officer. Two years after the merger, only a few key Nextel executives remained, with many former Nextel middle- and upper-level managers having left, citing reasons including the unbridgeable cultural difference between the two companies.[citation needed]


Sprint wireline is also responsible for traditional telecommunications relay service (TRS), speech to speech relay service (STS), and captioned telephone service (CTS). Sprint is in the process of upgrading these services from a TDM network to an IP-based network[85]


In the early stages of network build-out, the company relied significantly on network partners known as affiliates to rapidly expand its coverage. These affiliates would lease Sprint's PCS spectrum licenses in a specific geographic area, typically rural areas, and smaller cities, and provide wireless service using the Sprint brand. Sprint provided back-end support such as billing and telephone-based customer service, while the affiliates built and maintained the network, sold equipment to customers, and staffed the retail stores in their specific regions. Its customers could "roam" across Sprint-operated and affiliate-operated portions of the network without being aware of the distinction, and vice versa. Outwardly, efforts were made to make it appear as if the network was operated by a single entity under the Sprint name, though complex revenue-sharing agreements were in place which was very similar in nature to cross-carrier roaming tariffs. In later years, the relationship between Sprint and its affiliates grew contentious, particularly after Sprint's acquisition of Nextel. Various affiliates included Swiftel Communications in Brookings, South Dakota;[86] Shentel in northern Virginia, and parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and West Virginia.


Sprint Corporation allowed certain Sprint MVNOs to accept and activate old Sprint-branded phones through its "Bring Your Own Sprint Device" program which was established for Sprint's initiative to further reduce the number of cell phones that were thrown away each year. The program was also beneficial to MVNOs customers who did not want to pay subsidized prices.[87] 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

  • Pedro Marquez
  • Newt Carbon
    Newt Carbon
  • Viola Gray
    Viola Gray
  • Bill Bucher
    Bill Bucher
  • Antonia Ebner Leon
    Antonia Ebner Leon
bottom of page